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Difference Between a Dog’s Axillary and Rectal Temperature

by | Nov 14, 2019

Normal body temperature for dogs is between 101 and 102.5 degrees Fahrenheit (between 38.3 and 39.2 degrees Celsius), but some pets maintain a baseline temperature slightly above or below the average. However, if your pet’s temperature rises above 104 degrees F or falls below 99 degrees F, they need to see a veterinarian.

What Is Axillary Temperature Reading?

Axillary temperature is taken by inserting the thermometer gently into the horizontal ear canal at a 90 degree angle with the pet’s head, and there are also axillary temperature sensors that can be placed on the dog to read its temperature. The median axillary temperature in dogs is 101.1 degrees Fahrenheit or 38.4 degrees Celsius.

What Is Rectal Temperature Reading?

Rectal temperature is taken by inserting the thermometer gently and slowly into the rectum of the dog, and the thermometer is often lubricated to ease insertion. For small dogs, the thermometer is advanced about an inch, while the thermometer is advanced 2-3 inches for larger dogs. The median rectal temperature in dogs is 102 degrees Fahrenheit or 38.9 degrees Celsius.

Axillary Temperature vs Rectal Temperature Readings in Dogs

So, what’s the difference between axillary temperature sensors and rectal thermometers in canines? Only 1 degree. In an outside study of active and awake dogs mounted axillary temperatures were not clinically different from a digital rectal thermometer. If axillary temperature sensors are placed properly on a dog, then the temperature of these thermometers will read correctly. These thermometers offer a breakthrough in the industry to put less stress on the dog through rectal temperatures.

Measure Your Dog’s Temperature With MeasureON!

So, what’s the difference between axillary temperature sensors and rectal thermometers in canines? Only one degree. In an outside study of active and awake dogs mounted axillary temperatures were not clinically different from a digital rectal thermometer. If axillary temperature sensors are placed properly on a dog, then the temperature of these thermometers will read correctly. These thermometers offer a breakthrough in the industry to put less stress on the dog through rectal temperatures.